Take a Stand and Walk it Out!

women standing at officeLately, there has been more and more published about how sitting for too long can be bad for you. And based on the scientific findings, we office workers should all be concerned.

In several studies it has been shown that the consequences of long stretches of inactivity or sitting down range from increase anxiety, low level of HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels of C-reactive protein (which can indicate inflammation), and triglycerides (blood fats – not a good thing), and even certain cancers and serious heart conditions.

What can we do?

The good news is that additional studies have been conducted which found that the simple solution is to take more breaks and stick to regular exercise. For some of us that means to start small, such as taking your breaks away from your desk and doing something or when talking on the phone simply standing up for the duration of the conversation.

Build up your exercise regimen by walking briskly every day. Doctors recommend 30 minutes a day for adults. This might seem like a lot for us busy adults who have kids, spouses, a job and the like. But not if you use the time you have – if you have an hour lunch, use the last 30 minutes to walk around your parking garage at work or even an empty conference room. Be creative and think simply…it could save your life!

Good health to you!

Yay! It’s World Heart Day!!

heartSeptember 29, 2013 is World Heart Day.  It’s all about taking a better life-course approach which includes incorporating preventive measures and taking better control of cardiovascular disease.  This movement is particularly geared toward women and children.  Why so?

In regards to women, Womenshealth.gov states that in the U.S. alone, one in four women die of heart disease every year.  While heart disease is a leading cause of death among men, women are more likely to die from an attack.  Among minorities, heart disease is particularly a concern – more African American and Latin American women are obese, do not get enough exercise, suffer from high blood pressure and diabetes.  But not to worry, most of all these symptoms are preventable and workable.  World Heart Day teaches us that with small steps and changes anything is possible!

We all know the common steps to prevention and control of heart disease but what about the other questions that may arise?  For instance, do birth control pills or birth control patches increase the risk of heart disease?  For most young, healthy women – neither option poses a risk.  But if you are over 35, have high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol or smoke, you are at risk.  The best thing to do is talk to your doctor about your options to take for a healthier you.

And lastly, always remember if you begin to experience the following symptoms, seek medical help as soon as possible:

  • Pain or discomfort in the center of the chest. The pain or discomfort can be mild or strong. It can last more than a few minutes, or it can go away and come back.
  • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, back, neck, jaw, or stomach
  • Shortness of breath (feeling like you can’t get enough air). The shortness of breath often occurs before or along with the chest pain or discomfort.
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach) or vomiting
  • Feeling faint or woozy
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat

Getting Back on the Wagon

SI am serious about trying to lose weight this time.  Uh hum too.  As a matter of fact, I’ve started out very well.  I’ve kept to my exercise schedule.  Yeah, yeah I know it’s just January 27th and I did only restart January 1st.  But it makes me wonder…when did I begin to loooooooooove food?  When younger, I liked food.  I even had my favorites – pasta and breads.  But you know, I’d eat and then go off to do whatever.  Now, after one meal, I’m thinking feverishly about what I’ll eat next time!

How big am I you ask?  I’ll bite – no pun intended.  I’m the size of most women in the U.S. – size 12-14.  But lo’ and behold, I’m the height of 5 foot 3!  Sigh.  So this is going to be it, huh?  A steady battle with my frienemy food.  It’s so funny because in the past, I would try trick myself too.  Sometimes, after I’m so bad, guess what I’d do?  Honey, get on the treadmill and drink four cups of water!  Ha!  How’s that for living?  Bet that will cancel all those bad boy calories out!  Don’t laugh, it’s all I got.

Anyway, yes I love me and I love my body.  So there, it’s not that.  I don’t think a person’s IQ goes down as their poundage goes up.  If that were the case, I would have a serious problem.  It’s like this; I don’t want to be Skinny Minnie.  That was never a sexy look to me anyway.  I just want to be able to tie my shoes without my breath being cut off.  Or not have a waist that jiggles so much that it looks like I’m dancing when I’m just walking.  But most of all, I guess I think about my father.  I want to do better than him.  I don’t want to die at the early age of 53 brought on by severe complications from diabetes.

This year I’ll be 44.

So, here I go.  Again.  Gettin’ back on the wagon.

So true and worth repeating.

Fit Body Now

My list of things that I think may prevent you from losing weight:

1. Eating when you are bored. I am a college student and when it’s time for me to study, I get hungry. Why? because I don’t want to study so I’m distracting myself. Studying bores me, so I say if I’m eating then I can’t study. When you are at work or school or at home, keep a bottle of water near you. Drink it when you get the urge to take a break and eat. Also, many times we are actually thirsty and dehydrated, not hungry. And drinking water will fill your stomach up with zero calories. Another method, is to keep gum with you. The chewing and flavor will trick your mind into thinking that you are eating.

2. Portion Sizes. I have near been to another country other then the United States. I hear…

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A Few Practical Tips for Better Health

provided by Microsoft

During the National Women’s Health Week (May 8-14, 2011), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is encouraging women to take stock and take charge of their health.  Below are a few of the tips that are encouraged:

•Getting at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity, 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous physical activity, or a combination of both, each week

•Eating a nutritious diet

•Visiting a health care professional to receive regular checkups and preventive screenings

•Avoiding risky behaviors, such as smoking and not wearing a seatbelt

•Paying attention to mental health, including getting enough sleep and managing stress

For more practical tips, please visit Womenshealth.gov.